Teresa Burga
Aleatory Structures
curated by Heike Munder
Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Zurich, Switzerland
26 May – 12 August 2018
Opening: Friday, 25th of May 2018

 

With this extensive survey exhibition, the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst introduces audiences to the many-faceted oeuvre of the Peruvian artist Teresa Burga (b. Iquitos, Peru, 1935), which encompasses paintings and environments in the vein of Pop art as well as conceptual drawings and cybernetic installations. This broad range of media, formal means, and aesthetic idioms goes hand in hand with a resolute thematic focus: Burga inquires into the latitude for individual action that remains given entrenched conventions and power structures. Her works are highly detailed protocols of the social realities of their time; their aim is to provide the beholders with information. With often playful precision, the artist highlights connections between causes and effects to draw attention to the individual’s ability to influence social conditions. The basis for such self-determination, Burga argues, is the systematic gathering of data and information that has been a salient consequence of technological progress. Widely unquestioned gender roles as well as stereotypes perpetuated by the art world are exposed to critical scrutiny. As a female exponent of Latin American art, Burga was often ahead of her time; now well over eighty, she continues to make art. Only in the past few years have the local as well as international art scenes begun to pay closer attention to her work.

Curated by Heike Munder, director, Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, the retrospective is the artist’s first solo exhibition in Switzerland. A monograph accompanying the show will be released by JRP|Ringier for the opening. The exhibition and catalogue are produced in collaboration with the Kestnergesellschaft, Hannover.

 

Further information: www.migrosmuseum.ch

Teresa Burga “Sin titulo / Untitled”, 1967, Environment, Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Barbara Thumm and Pinault Collection, Photo: Nici Wegener